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April 21, 2010
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The "Normal" type of Pokemon tends to have a Terran sort of cell structure. In many ways, they behave like normal animals, sometimes being confused for such. However, the "moves" Normal-type Pokemon can use vary greatly from the Earthly norm. With Normal-type powers and abilities, some Pokemon have the capacity to regenerate themselves, move at speeds unknown to other animals, shoot concentrated beams of energy, and even explode.

"Flying" type of Pokemon seem to be some offshoot of the Normal type, and as a rule tend to have wings or some kind of flight apparatus. Like Fighting-type Pokemon, they have hyper-dense muscle, but only in the muscles along and around the wings. This allows Pokemon of the Flying type to generate enormous aerial force, some even able to cut things with their wings or generate G-force winds.

"Bug" types tend to be quite interesting, as they generally share a symbiotic relationship with a sort of non-Pokemon creature, the Blood Mite (Sanguiparvulus utiliparasitus), living in its blood stream. Such Pokemon of the Bug type end up resembling Earth arthropods themselves, as well as acquiring some abilities shared with arthropods here on Earth (sapping bodily fluids, generation of silk, etc.). Most of the Bug types have exoskeletal armor along with their internal skeletons, which tend to be weaker as a result.
Here, we take a look at some of the elemental types of more common Pokemon, such as Pidgey and Caterpie.
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:iconshadow-wasser:
If Bug Types are defined by (a) their chitin and (b) their 'blood mites,' then how does one deal with the odd case of Skorupi/Drapion? Skorupi is a small, chitinous pokemon of the Poison/Bug type, while Drapion is a large chitinous pokemon of the Poison/Dark type. It loses the Bug type!

Does Drapion have 'blood mites?' If so, why is it not a Bug type? And if not, how can it have chitin?
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:iconrosutu:
A fine point you bring. Since Skorupi comes before Drapion, perhaps Drapion "grows out" of requiring blood mites in an extreme amount for its chitin, or loses chitinous armor altogether, in favor of keratin or bone.
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:iconkyuubinoyouko15:
all of you... GET A 1UP!
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:iconrosutu:
Thank you.
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:iconargentdandelion:
Fascinating. I do not understand the statement of how Mew's development mimics its evolution, through, since Mew does not evolve (speaking of the individual process, not the millions-of-years process).

So, the Blood Mite does not Pokévolve (my term for evolution in the Pokémon sense), which is reasonable, of course. How does the Blood Mite react when its hosts evolve? Their bodies change drastically and suddenly, as is the case with Kricketot to Kricketune, rather than the more-realistically-applicable transition of Caterpie-Metapod-Butterfree.

Are there some Bug-types, aside from Bug-type Arceus, being as it is and exception, that do not have any or any particular symbiosis with the Blood Mite?

Additionally, would it be possible for you to compile all this information on the Blood Mite onto a separate piece, for categorical purposes?
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:iconrosutu:
Well, you see, the Mew we know are something like panda bears in their reproductive willingness. Unlike their descendants, Mew will only breed with a member of the exact same species, while their sexual organs are so far in morphology from any other that a lot of Pokemon scientists can't even tell the difference between male or female. However, we can infer from fossil evidence that there is some ontogeny recapitulaing phylogeny in their development from juvenile to adult.

Generally, Blood Mites will reproduce like bacteria some time before evolution to compensate for the host's sudden need for huge amounts of chiting.

A fascinating note on Arceus: it becomes a Bug type via a Plate, because the Plate is actually created from the chitin of Blood Mites. Aside from creatures like Arceus, though, there are no Bug-type Pokemon as of yet that have been found without the Blood Mite.

And I may compile information on the Blood Mite in something about non-Pokemon creatures on the Pokemon world.
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:iconargentdandelion:
"Similar to Pokémon, the Blood Mite's cells are able to generate and store enormous amounts of energy". Is this a convergent trait, this similarity to Pokémon? For it to be a convergently-developed trait, to be similar to Pokémon in this manner, is more likely than the Blood Mite being closely related to Pokémon.

In the Pokémon World, how should one define what is Pokémon and non-Pokémon? To differentiate that the Blood Mite is one of the few non-Pokémon animals on the planet? I would think that the capacity to generate and store such massive amounts of energy would classify it as a Pokémon, but you could clarify the terms.

......also, how do Blood Mites...appear? Are they within a Pokémon, fresh in the egg, or they do they acquire it later?

I think you have heard of the velvet worm. Velvet worms....like to use String Shot on their prey. Velvet worms are cool like Pokémon.
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:iconrosutu:
First off, I will cover a basic thing with Pokemon (at least, how I'm explaining it here): Pokemon are alien life-forms, native to an ancient colony planet, previously thought to have been lost. The same goes for the Blood-Mite, but it is not a member of the Pokemon phylum.

All Pokemon can trace their ancestry back to Mew (Primordium mew), a small mammal-like creature. Mew and its descendents were unique in that their development from child to adult somewhat mimicked their evolution; fossils of tiny, rat-like creatures (now known to be juvenile Mew) have been found with larger Mew. The Blood Mite, meanwhile, does no such thing; its development starts from a single cell, morphing into a tiny, water-bear-like animal, without any clue as to how its evolution took place. We can only infer its ancestry from fossils and gene coding.

Interestingl enough, the Blood Mite is the reason why there is a Bug egg group; from conception, they form a symbiosis with the embryo. By the time the Pokemon hatches from its egg, its chitinous shell is already fully formed.
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:iconargentdandelion:
Could more information about Sanguiparvulus utiliparasitus, the Blood Mite, be provided? The only article for a "Blood Mite" I can find on Bulbapedia infests bees, and I cannot imagine any facilities it could use for symbiosis.
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